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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of High-yielding varieties of wheat in developing countries found in the catalog.

High-yielding varieties of wheat in developing countries

Sheldon K. Tsu

High-yielding varieties of wheat in developing countries

by Sheldon K. Tsu

  • 348 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in Washington] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Developing countries.
    • Subjects:
    • Wheat -- Varieties.,
    • Agriculture -- Developing countries.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 30-36.

      Statement[by Sheldon K. Tsu.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSB191.W5 T78
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvi, 40 p.
      Number of Pages40
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5276332M
      LC Control Number71614603

      Varieties in Developing Countries by Dana G. Dalrymple, Dr. N.C. Brady, former director general of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), wrote, “The most significant technological accomplishment of this century in international agriculture is the development of high-yielding cereal crop varieties.   To stack the high-yield deck in your favor, carefully choose the most suitable wheat varieties for your farm. To begin, select at least three different high-yielding varieties, ideally with early.

      To avoid the pitfalls of the Green Revolution, international plant breeding programs in developing countries today should, 1. promote the adoption of a few high-yielding varieties over wide areas. 2. breed crops primarily for high-input environments.   Indeed, the Green Revolution for rice as well as wheat, defined as the development and diffusion of high-yielding varieties, took place in tropical Asia in the s and s, when the population pressure on the limited land became severe enough (David and Otsuka ).

      Peter Johnson, wheat specialist with Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, made quite the splash at Farm Tech last week. A regular in 's Wheat School, @WheatPete (as he's known on Twitter) has very set views on maximizing wheat production, and he's not afraid to tell a farmer, point blank, what that farmer is doing wrong. Some find him a bit brash, and.   The Green Revolution in India was initiated in the s by introducing high-yielding varieties of rice and wheat to increase food production in order to alleviate hunger and poverty. Post-Green Revolution, the production of wheat and rice doubled due to initiatives of the government, but the production of other food crops such as indigenous rice varieties and millets declined.


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High-yielding varieties of wheat in developing countries by Sheldon K. Tsu Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Tsu, Sheldon K. (Sheldon Kwoh-ping), High-yielding varieties of wheat in developing countries. Washington] U.S. Originally published in under title: Imports and plantings of high-yielding varieties of wheat and rice in the less developed nations.

Description: x, pages ; 24 cm. Series Title: Foreign agricultural economic report, no. Other Titles: Development and spread of high-yielding varieties of wheat.

Scientific breeding in the twentieth century greatly accelerated wheat‘s evolution, producing high-yielding varieties that helped avoid famine in many developing countries.

Emerging scientific tools hold promise for identifying and tapping new, useful genetic diversity within wheat‘s primary and secondary gene pools and, through genetic Format: Hardcover. Borlaug and most agricultural scientists believed the new high-yielding varieties of rice, corn, wheat, and other cereal crops, which were the staple foods in developing countries, would end hunger there and enable the governments of those countries to feed their rapidly growing populations.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk. Development and spread of high-yielding varieties of wheat and rice in the less developed nations Item Preview remove-circlePages: Dalrymple, Dana G., "Development and Spread of High-Yielding Varieties of Wheat and Rice in the Less Developed Nations," Foreign Agricultural Economic Report (FAER)United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.

Handle: RePEc:ags:uersfe DOI: /   Few major nations may be expected to achieve Mexico's nearly complete adoption, because of a vari- ety of supply and demand factors. TABLE I Area under high-yielding varieties of wheat and rice in non-Communist less-developed countries in Asia and North Africa (from Dalrymple, ) Crop Year Area (ha) Wheat Rice Total /66 9 49 Jai Prakash Singh (45), a farmer from Varanasi, has developed a number of high yielding varieties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), paddy (Oryza sativa L.), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Mill.), and mustard (Brassica juncea L.) following simple selection method.

His village Tandiya is 30 km away from Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh. It is a small village with about 60 households. The Green Revolution, or the Third Agricultural Revolution, is a set of research technology transfer initiatives occurring between and the late s, that increased agricultural production worldwide, beginning most markedly in the late s.

The initiatives resulted in the adoption of new technologies, including high-yielding varieties (HYVs) of cereals, especially dwarf wheat and rice. Inseveral varieties such as Sonalika and Kalyan Sona, which were high yielding and disease resistant, were introduced all over the wheat-growing belt of India.

Semi-dwarf rice varieties were derived from IR-8, (developed at International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Philippines) and Taichung Native-1 (from Taiwan). Development and spread of high-yielding varieties of wheat and rice in the less developed nations.

[Dana G Dalrymple] Print book: National government publication: English: 6th edView all editions and formats: # Wheat--Varieties--Developing countries\/span> \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0 schema. Book • Edited by: Application of Genetic and Genomic Tools in Wheat for Developing Countries.

Book chapter Full text access. coupled with the predicted detrimental effects of climate change on its production demands a great push toward developing high yielding varieties.

Grain yield enhancement together with yield stability. Get this from a library. Development and spread of high-yielding varieties of wheat and rice in the less developed nations. [Dana G Dalrymple; United States.

Department of. The wheat varieties produce at least 15% higher a yield than any other type, by holding more grains on each stalk, and are currently cultivated over more than 40 million hectares across the world. The success of the Green Revolution in these developing countries is ascribed mainly to the adoption of High Yielding Varieties (HYVs) of wheat and rice along with increased use of fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation (Davies, ).

Famines and Food Scarcity. Humanity has been facing problems like famines and food scarcity since times. A rev. and expanded ed. published in under title: Development and spread of high-yielding varieties of wheat and rice in the less developed nations, and issued as FAER Beginning with the ed.

published under title: Development and spread of high-yielding varieties of wheat and rice in the less developed nations.

Description. Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) in Mexico. Although the term Green Revolution originally described developments for rice and wheat,high-yielding varieties (HYVs) have since been developed for other major food crops important to developing countries,including sorghum,millet, maize,cassava,and er,a full-fledged system of.

It has been claimed that plant breeding reduces genetic diversity in elite germplasm which could seriously jeopardize the continued ability to improve crops. The main objective of this study was to examine the loss of genetic diversity in spring bread wheat during (1) its domestication, (2) the change from traditional landrace cultivars (LCs) to modern breeding varieties, and (3) 50 years of.

Scientific breeding in the twentieth century greatly accelerated wheat`s evolution, producing high-yielding varieties that helped avoid famine in many developing countries.

LG Motown is a top-yielding soft wheat which meets the needs of the distilling market, and bucks the trend of early maturing varieties producing lower yields so, unlike other high yielding wheats, LG Motown doesn’t rely on having a longer grain fill period to build high yields.

High-Yielding Varieties of Wheat and Rice in Developing Countries Dana G. Dalrymple High-yielding varieties (HYVs)-also known as modern varieties (MVs)-of wheat and rice have spread more widely, more quickly, than any other technological innovation in the his-tory of agriculture in the developing countries (DCs).

First introduced in the mid.IR8 - The first of the modern, high-yielding, semi-dwarf released to stave off the mass famine that was predicted for Asia in the s. It out-produced all existing rice varieties by a factor of two. IRThis early maturing variety had multiple pest resistance, and had been planted to more than 11 million hectares by the s.The use of high-yielding varieties (HYV's) of wheat and rice has expanded sharply in the developing nations in recent years.

This report reviews the development of these varieties and documents their yearly spread in statistical terms. Major emphasis is placed on semi-dwarf (1) wheat varieties .